fun facts about plumbing

Albert Einstein was named an honorary member of the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union after saying publicly that he would become a plumber if he had to do it all over again.


The world's most famous plumbers are probably video game superstars Mario and Luigi, of Nintendo's Super Mario Brothers series.


Archeologists have recovered a portion of a water plumbing system from the Pyramid of Cheops in Egypt. The evidence of indoor plumbing in palaces has dating back to 2500 B.C.E.


Copper piping, which is the #1 material used for plumbing work in today's world, is the same material that the Egyptians used to lay their own pipe - some 3000 years ago.


Since 1963 (the year CDA was established), more than 28 billion feet or about 5.3 million miles of copper plumbing tube has been installed in U.S. buildings. That's equivalent to a coil wrapping around the Earth more than 200 times. The current installation rate now exceeds a billion feet per year.


In a typical home, more than 9,000 gallons of water are wasted while running the faucet waiting for hot water. As much as 15% of your annual water heating costs can be wasted heating this extra 9,000 gallons.


If a drip from your faucet fills an eight ounce glass in 15 minutes, it will waste 180 gallons per month and 2,160 gallons per year.


A low flush toilet can save you up to 18,000 gallons of water per year.


The word "Plumbing" derives from the Latin word for Lead, plumbum. Incidentally, the periodic table element label for lead, Pb, is based on the same word.


Pipes haven't always been made of metal. In the 1800s, both Boston and Montreal used wooden pipes; they were logs that were hollowed out and tapered at the ends.


There are actually two common types of plungers - a toilet plunger and a sink/shower plunger. Toilet plungers narrow at the bottom to fit into the toilet drain, while sink and shower plungers have a flat rim.


In 2004, there was over 91,000 miles of water distribution piping in the U.S. 78% of that pipe is made of PVC.


In Japan, some urinals have voice-activated flush mechanisms. According to wikipedia, these urinals respond to as many as 30 different languages and several terms.


In 1929, a series of sewer explosions occurred in Ottawa, Canada. Contrary to initial reactions, it likely wasn't caused by Methane gas, but rather by shop owners pouring flamable oils down drains as the still-unregulated automobile industry took off.


Hot water heat recycling is the process of recovering heat from used water (primarily from sinks, showers, dishwashers, and washing machines). Heat exchanger systems can recover as much as 60% of the heat that normally goes down the drain.


The Chicago Water Tower was one of the only buildings to survive the Great Chicago fire of 1871. Now a historical site, It is the only building from this time still standing in the area.


At 140 degrees, it takes 5 seconds for water to burn skin. At 160 degrees, it takes only 1/2 of a second. Home hot water systems should be set to no hotter than 125 degrees.


Famous and often controversial rockstar Ozzy Osbourne was a plumber's apprentice before getting into the music industry.


Sir John Harington is credited with inventing the flushable toilet in 1596, hence the American nickname for it, - the john...


The word "plumber" dates all the way back to the Roman Empire. In Rome, pipes were originally made from lead, which is "plumbum" in Latin. People who worked with lead were called Plumbarius, which was eventually shortened to the word we use today.


Sources:
www.1800anytyme.com  www.oneprojectcloser.com   www.ppp-rtp.com

Lexington Plumbing, Kansas City
The term 'plumbers' was a popular name given to the covert White House Special Investigations Unit established during the presidency of Richard Nixon in response to the leaked 'Pentagon Papers' documents. Their job was to plug intelligence leaks in the U.S. Government relating to the Vietnam War; hence the term 'plumbers'.